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People Encouraged to ‘Picture Yourself in a Historic Place’

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) -- In recognition of National Historic Preservation Month in May, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), National Park Service, and National Trust for Historic Preservation today announced a photo contest inviting people to enter by sharing photos they have taken of themselves, family, and friends on their own social media sites and using the hashtag #MyHistoricPlace.

The first phase of a memorial honoring the nation's first African American Marines was dedicated at a July 29 ceremony in Jacksonville, NC. (Read the Washington Post story here.)

The National Montford Point Marine Memorial is named after the camp where some 20,000 African Americans underwent Marine Corps training in the 1940s. The service branch was opened to them following President Franklin Roosevelt's 1941 signing of Executive Order 8802, which prohibited racial discrimination in the armed forces.