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Emily Choi, who joined the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation on September 3, 2019, as an assistant historic preservation specialist with the Office of Federal Agency Programs has won the Lawyers’ Committee on Cultural Heritage Preservation (LCCHP) student writing competition.

Choi, a former ACHP intern, will receive a $500 award from LCCHP for her paper, “Safeguarding Native American Traditional Knowledge Under Existing Legal Frameworks: Why and How Federal Agencies must Re-Interpret FOIA’s ‘Trade Secret Exemption.’ ” She also will be featured on the LCCHP website.

Valerie Hauser, director of the ACHP’s Office of Native American Affairs, is in New York City this week attending the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues Eighteenth Session, serving as the U.S. State Department’s subject-matter expert. The theme of the two-week session from April 22- May 3 is “Traditional Knowledge: Generation, Transmission and Protection.”

Read Director Hauser's statement to the session. Or, watch the video.

In recognition of National Volunteer Month and Landscape Architecture Month, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is celebrating the many historic gardens around the nation that could not operate without their dedicated volunteers.

The ACHP declared Dunn Gardens in Seattle, Washington, a Preserve America Steward in 2016 for the core group of volunteers who help maintain and interpret the historic gardens, designed by the noted Olmsted Brothers landscaping firm for Arthur Dunn in 1915. The Olmsted Brothers’ design retained and enhanced many of the site’s natural features. Following Dunn’s death in 1945, the property was divided among family members.

The ACHP celebrates National Volunteer Month this April supporting the tireless volunteers who help keep America’s historic places open for the public to learn from and enjoy year round. One such group of volunteers works at Newark, New Jersey’s famous Essex County Branch Brook Park.

The park was named a Preserve America Steward in 2012 for the volunteer effort aimed at restoring and preserving this historic park, conceived of by legendary landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead Sr. and designed by his sons. Branch Brook Park, America’s first county park dating  to 1895, provides 360 acres of green space in one of New Jersey’s most densely populated cities.

Terry Guen, FASLA, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation expert member and  landscape architect, principal & founder of Chicago-based Terry Guen Design Associates.