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On July 8, The San Diego Union-Tribune published an op-ed by ACHP Chair Sara Bronin in which she lays out how adaptive reuse of historic buildings can help ease California’s housing crisis.

Bronin writes: “Given the magnitude of the housing shortage, we’ll need an all-hands-on-deck approach. I’m optimistic about California and its largest cities making meaningful progress in advancing policies that make the most of its existing building stock.”

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On June 28, 2024, the Supreme Court of the United States rendered its decision in the case of Loper Bright Enters. v. Raimondo (Loper). That decision overturned the long-standing Chevron doctrine, under which courts would defer to permissible agency interpretations of ambiguities in the statutes those agencies administered. After Loper, courts will exercise their independent judgment and use traditional tools of statutory construction to resolve statutory ambiguities, without deferring to an agency interpretation of the law.

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WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers (NCSHPO), and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have executed a Nationwide Programmatic Agreement (NPA) that will make it easier to maintain, repair, and upgrade their historic facilities to better address climate resiliency and sustainability.

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On July 3, Newsweek published ACHP Chair Sara Bronin’s op-ed on the need to restore Lahaina’s Native Hawaiian cultural sites following last year’s devastating wildfires.

Bronin writes: “Lahaina will rebuild… The crucial question is this: Can Lahaina rebuild in a way that honors and restores the Native Hawaiian history and heritage reflected in the destroyed sites and buildings?… I firmly believe it can and must.”

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WASHINGTON, D.C.--The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), USDA Forest Service, Wayne National Forest in Ohio, and Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia joined together for the third year for the Cultural Heritage in the Forest (CHIF) HBCU Internship Program. The internship for nine students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) from around the country featured hands-on training in cultural resources management, historic preservation, and conservation.

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