News


News Filter
  • 50th Anniversary of Historic Preservation Act
  • ACHP HUD Secretary's Award
  • ACHP Member
  • African American History
  • Announcement
  • Business Meeting
  • Chairman
  • Chairman's Award
  • Community Revitalization
  • Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Disaster Recovery
  • Economic Benefits
  • Fellowships
  • Heritage Tourism
  • Historic Place
  • Historic Preservation
  • Historic Tax Credits
  • Historically Black Colleges and Universities
  • Holidays
  • Housing Rehabilitation
  • Inclusiveness/Diversity
  • Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations
  • Consultation with Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations
  • Consultation with Indian tribes
  • Indian Tribes
  • Native Hawaiian
  • Indigenous
  • Intern
  • Interns
  • Internships
  • Legislative Policy
  • Memorandum of Understanding
  • National Historic Preservation Month
  • Native American Heritage Month
  • News article
  • News Item
  • Partnership
  • Photo Contest
  • Press Release
  • Railroad
  • Section 106
  • Section 106 Success Stories
  • Staff
  • Strategic Plan
  • Telecommunications
  • Termination
  • Touching History
  • Volunteer
  • Women's History
  • Youth
  • Reset

In honor of International Youth Day, the ACHP is highlighting a Preserve America community with a unique claim to youth history: Seward, Alaska. In 1927, as the territory of Alaska considered statehood, territorial governor George Parks and the Alaska American Legion organized a contest to design a territorial flag, believing having such an emblem may help Alaska become a state. The contest was open to all Alaskan children from the 7th to 12th grades, and the ultimate winner, an Aleutian boy named Benny Benson, hailed from the Jesse Lee Home in Seward. Benson's flag was designed as an homage to Alaska's natural landscape and position as the northern-most American territory. Benson won a $1,000 scholarship in the contest, and the flag was adopted in May 1927.

TOPICS

The National Park Service has announced a new grant program aimed at preserving sites of importance to the African American struggle for civil rights in the 20th century. The grants are being funded by the Historic Preservation Fund, and $7.75 million is available. Potential projects include survey and documentation, interpretation and education, oral histories, brick and mortar preservation, and more. Historically Black Colleges and Universities can apply for the grants in partnership with states, territories, federally-recognized tribes, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian organizations, or local governments. Applications are due October 14, 2016.

TOPICS

WASHINGTON, D.C.– President Barack Obama has announced his intent to appoint Luis Hoyos to an Expert Member seat on the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP).

Hoyos is an architect and Professor of Architecture at the California State Polytechnic University in Pomona, where he teaches historic preservation and urban design. He has received awards for the design of several historic building rehabilitations, including El Pueblo de Los Angeles, the Point Fermin Lighthouse, the Palmer Hotel and the Cabrillo Beach Bathhouse.

An 8-year-old in Michigan is fast becoming a celebrity for his ingenious plan to teach history to passersby in his neighborhood. Read the story here.
TOPICS

The Marine Corps Poster Series highlights historic properties in Marine Corps care. The ACHP worked with staff at the Marine Corps and the National Park Service to support showcasing historic properties and giving the story of their founding and use by the Marines throughout history. The “Defending Our Cultural Heritage” sites featured included the Oldest Post in the Corps: Marine Corps Barracks Washington; World War II Legacy at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Montford Point training camp for the first African American Marines at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; 450-year Expeditionary Legacy at Parris Island, South Carolina; and Remembering California’s Ranches, San Diego, California, near Camp Pendleton.