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About the ACHP: General Information

Mission statement
Introduction
ACHP Activities
Section 106
For More Information


Mission statement

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation promotes the preservation, enhancement, and sustainable use of our nation’s diverse historic resources, and advises the President and the Congress on national historic preservation policy.
                                                             —adopted by ACHP membership January 2011


Introduction

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) is an independent federal agency that promotes the preservation, enhancement, and productive use of our nation's historic resources, and advises the President and Congress on national historic preservation policy.

The goal of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which established the ACHP in 1966, is to have federal agencies act as responsible stewards of our nation's resources when their actions affect historic properties. The ACHP is the only entity with the legal responsibility to encourage federal agencies to factor historic preservation into federal project requirements.

As directed by NHPA, the ACHP serves as the primary federal policy advisor to the President and Congress; recommends administrative and legislative improvements for protecting our nation's heritage; advocates full consideration of historic values in federal decisionmaking; and reviews federal programs and policies to promote effectiveness, coordination, and consistency with national preservation policies.


ACHP Activities

The ACHP's 23 statutorily designated members, including the Chairman who heads the agency, address policy issues, direct program initiatives, and make recommendations regarding historic preservation to the President, Congress, and heads of other federal agencies. Members meet four times per year to conduct business.

An Executive Committee, headed by the Chairman and Vice Chairman, governs agency operations such as management, budget, and legislative policy. Also serving on the Executive Committee are the Department of Interior and ACHP members who chair three standing committees that correspond to the ACHP's three program areas.

  • Preservation Initiatives focuses on partnerships and program initiatives such as heritage tourism to promote preservation with groups such as state and local governments, Indian tribes, and the private sector.

  • Communications, Education, and Outreach conveys the ACHP's vision and message to constituents and the general public through public information and education programs and a public recognition program for historic preservation achievement.

  • Federal Agency Programs administers the National Historic Preservation Act's Section 106 review process and works with federal agencies to help improve how they consider historic preservation values in their programs.

A Budget and Planning Committee is convened under the direction of the Vice Chairman and advises the Chairman and management on budget formulation and execution, management and implementation of the strategic plan, and serves as the audit committee on behalf of the membership.

A professional staff that supports the ACHP's daily operations is headquartered in Washington, D.C.


Section 106

Section 106 applies when two thresholds are met: 1) there is a federal or federally licensed action, including grants, licenses, and permits, and 2) that action has the potential to affect properties listed in or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

Section 106 requires each federal agency to identify and assess the effects of its actions on historic resources. The responsible federal agency must consult with appropriate state and local officials, Indian tribes, applicants for federal assistance, and members of the public and consider their views and concerns about historic preservation issues when making final project decisions.

Effects are resolved by mutual agreement, usually among the affected state's State Historic Preservation Officer or the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, the federal agency, and any other involved parties. The ACHP may participate in controversial or precedent-setting situations.


For More Information

ACHP Membership
ACHP Staff Directory
Working with Section 106
Section 106 Cases

To contact ACHP, write, call, or e-mail:

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
401 F Street NW, Suite 308
Washington, DC 20001-2637
Phone: (202) 517-0200
E-mail: achp@achp.gov
Web site: www.achp.gov


Updated June 17, 2014

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