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Home arrowNews arrowSeptember 25, 2013

Historic Preservation Provides Great Benefits for Nation’s Communities

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Leading national experts discussed how historic preservation tools can assist economic, educational and cultural renewal in the nation’s communities at the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation annual conference on Sept. 19, 2013. The panel included ACHP Vice Chairman Clement A. Price.

Sonja Sohn addresses attendees as fellow session presenters (from left) David A. Morgan (American Express Company), Stephanie Meeks (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Clement A. Price (ACHP), Irvin Henderson (National Trust for Historic Preservation), and Robert Stanton (National Park Foundation) absorb her comments. Sonja Sohn addresses attendees as fellow session presenters (from left) David A. Morgan (American Express Company), Stephanie Meeks (National Trust for Historic Preservation), Clement A. Price (ACHP), Irvin Henderson (National Trust for Historic Preservation), and Robert Stanton (National Park Foundation) absorb her comments.

Titled “Preserving African American Historic Places: Breathing New Life into Our Communities,” the session highlighted how a number of commemorative moments are coming together to mark civil rights progress in the United States and how historic preservation offers a locally based, grassroots opportunity to improve the nation’s many communities with particular applicability to African Americans. The panel discussed how historic preservation provides opportunities to recognize and celebrate African American heritage resources while creating jobs, providing educational benefits, and revitalizing communities using preservation tools such as the Historic Tax Credit and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

The session featured several historic preservation luminaries: 

Dr. Price, the ACHP’s Vice Chairman and an eminent professor of history at Rutgers University, spoke about the commemorative civil rights season the nation currently is in. He told attendees about the National Historic Preservation Act and the tools it provides to the African American community to more effectively bring the economic and other benefits of historic preservation to the nation’s communities. 

Mr. Robert G. Stanton, former Director of the National Park Service and Chairman Emeritus, African American Experience Fund, noted current efforts to better preserve and present the full history of African Americans.

Ms. Stephanie Meeks, President of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, moderated the panel’s presentations and interactions with the audience.

Mr. Irvin Henderson, Chair of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Community Investment Corporation, discussed how Historic Tax Credits assist the effort to create more vibrant and successful communities.

Ms. Sonja Sohn, Founder and CEO of ReWired for Change (and an actress who was featured in the HBO series “The Wire”) as well as a community-based activist based in a historic building in Baltimore, talked about how her non-profit organization empowers at-risk youth, families and communities living in under-served areas through educational programming, community building support and media and social advocacy.

 

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