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Home arrow Historic Preservation Programs & Officers arrow Federal arrow U.S. Navy arrow Historic Family Housing PA
Programmatic Agreement Among the U.S. Navy, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers Regarding Management of Historic Family Housing Units


WHEREAS the U.S. Navy (Navy), manages historic family housing units as defined in Appendix A (Definition of Historic Family Housing Units); and

WHEREAS, the Navy has determined that its management of the historic family housing units may result in adverse effects such as those defined in 36 CFR Part 800, the regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), 16USC 470f, as amended (hereinafter Section 106); and

WHEREAS, the historic family housing units under the Navy's management vary widely in their significance, integrity, and potential for continuing use and reuse; and

WHEREAS, the Navy's management of the historic family housing units involves many routine maintenance, repair, and alteration projects; and

WHEREAS, in view of these facts, the Navy has elected to fulfill its obligations under Section 106 through execution and implementation of this Programmatic Agreement (PA) as provided in 36 CFR Part 800; and

WHEREAS, the purpose of this PA is to ensure that the historic and architectural qualities of the historic family housing units under the Navy's jurisdiction are appropriately recognized and considered in the course of the Navy's management and use of the historic family housing units; and

WHEREAS, the Navy has consulted with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (Council) and the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers (NCSHPO) in the development of this PA; and

WHEREAS, the Navy has provided for public involvement in the development of this PA in accordance with 36 CFR Part 800 through those organizations listed in Appendix C (Public Involvement) of this agreement.

NOW THEREFORE, the Navy, Council and NCSHPO agree that in the ongoing management and use of the historic family housing units under its jurisdiction, the following procedures and protocols shall apply.


STIPULATIONS

The Navy shall ensure that the following stipulations are carried out:

  1. Identification of Historic Family Housing Units.
    1. The Navy shall continue to consult with State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPO) to identify historic family housing units, and their specific significant elements, components and settings in accordance with Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act, and, as applicable, 36 CFR 60. Should the SHPO disagree with the Navy's determination that a property does not appear to qualify for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, the Navy shall accept the SHPO's finding, or refer the question to the Keeper of the National Register, in accordance with 36 CFR Part 63.

  2. Categorization of Family Housing Units.
    1. In consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) and other interested parties (if any), every installation commander/regional commander responsible for managing family housing units shall assess the historic significance of each family housing unit and assign it to one of two categories; each unit will be either 'listed on or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places" or 'not eligible for or listed on the National Register of Historic Places."

      1. Category I. Category I historic family housing units are those units that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places or are eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places as identified in accordance with Stipulation I(1). Those family housing units that are worthy of protection and investment under the NHPA, possess integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association (as applicable); and meet one or more of the following criteria:

        1. that are associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history; or
        2. that are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past; or

        3. that embody distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction, or that represent the work of a master, or that possess high artistic values, or that represent a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction; or
        4. that have yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in prehistory or history.

      2. Category II: Category II family housing units are those units that have been evaluated in accordance with Stipulation I(1) and found not to qualify for listing on the National Register of Historic Places or have been found to be non-contributing elements in a National Register historic district.

    2. Furthermore, in consultation with the appropriate SHPOs, the relative historic significance of all housing units in Category I shall be assessed and assigned a preservation treatment priority listed below in Stipulation III, Treatment of Family Housing Units. Assignment of both categories and preservation treatment priorities shall include historic family housing units that are located within installations, but are managed and maintained by a contractor, such as in Public/Private Ventures. Where the SHPO agrees with the Navy's assignment of categories, the Navy shall implement Stipulation III. Where the SHPO objects, the installation shall comply with Stipulation VII of this agreement. Categorization completion shall be monitored yearly by a senior command as assigned.

    3. Should the Navy decide that a unit or units are no longer to be used as family housing, and their reuse or demolition has not been treated under this agreement, those units will fall outside of this agreement and be separately subject to NHPA consultation.

    4. When conveying or leasing any Navy housing that is eligible for or listed in the National Register of Historic Places; Navy is responsible to ensure that the requirements of Section 106, NHPA are met.

  3. Treatment of Family Housing Units.
    1. The Navy shall ensure that its family housing units are managed and treated in the following manner in lieu of standard Section 106 compliance pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800.

      1. The Navy shall determine the relative significance of all Category I historic family housing units, according to Navy Historic Family Housing Categorization Protocol in Appendix B. Category I family housing units shall be assigned to one of three treatment priorities: Priority I, Priority II, or Priority III. Each priority shall correspond to a treatment protocol, provided in III.2. Category II treatment is distinguished in III.3. Criteria for determining appropriate priority levels for Category I family housing units are listed below:

      2. Priority I: Priority I historic family housing units are those units that are worthy of long-term preservation and investment because they possess significant integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association (as applicable); and meet one or more of the following criteria:

        1. The housing is of central importance in defining or maintaining the historic, architectural, or cultural character of the installation or site or some significant aspect of the installation, or of a historic district, including districts that may extend beyond the installation’s boundaries or exist in close proximity outside the installation’s boundaries.

        2. Has outstanding architectural, engineering, artistic, or landscape architectural characteristics.

        3. Has unusual importance for the interpretation of history, industrial development, military strategy, military organization or military tradition.

        4. Has considerable potential for continuing or adaptive use either by the Navy or by others.

        5. Represents a major past investment of resources, such as materials or energy that should not be wasted if such waste can be avoided.

        6. Is of particular and local historic value to the installation, the Navy or the neighboring community.

      3. Priority II: Priority II units are those family housing units eligible for or listed on the National Register of Historic Places and merit consideration for long-term preservation, but should not be assigned to Priority I because they meet one or more of the following criteria:

        1. The housing is not central to defining or maintaining the character of the installation, a significant aspect of the installation or site or a historic district.

        2. The integrity of those aspects of the housing that constitute its historic value has been compromised, limiting the potential for meaningful continuing or adaptive use.

        3. Are good, but not outstanding examples of architectural styles, engineering methods, artistic values or landscape architecture (e.g. multiple examples of a given type of significant structure).

        4. Represent a significant past investment of resources such as materials or energy, but not such a great investment that their disposal would constitute a major waste of resources.

        5. Can contribute to the interpretation of history, industrial development, military strategy, military organization or military tradition.

      4. Priority III: Priority III historic family housing units are those units that are eligible for or listed on the National Register of Historic Places and merit consideration in planning and decision making, but should not be assigned to Priority II because they meet one or more of the following criteria:

        1. Have integrity that has been significantly compromised, but remain eligible for the National Register.

        2. Comprise minor contextual aspects of an historic district (e.g., minor service structures).

        3. Have been subject to destruction or deterioration due to factors beyond the control of the Navy (e.g. due to catastrophic weather or other natural events).

        4. Require investments disproportionate to maintaining the integrity of the housing unit.

        5. Have limited potential for continuing or adaptive use.

    2. Treatment of Category I family housing units, Priorities I-III: Navy Management of its family housing units which have been categorized in accordance with Stipulation II and III above according to the terms of this agreement shall be deemed to be fully compliant with Section 106 requirements and 36 CFR Part 800.

      1. Management: The Navy shall manage all historic family housing units as follows:

        1. Excepting those housing units addressed in III.2.a.ii, below, maintain and repair all Category I units in accordance with the recommended procedures in the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties with Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating, Restoring, and Reconstructing Historic Buildings (National Park Service 1995, hereinafter Secretary's Standards) and the Historic Structures Preservation Manual (NAVFAC MO-913, September, 1991, hereinafter MO-913).

        2. Where there exist Category I, Priority III family housing units whose integrity is significantly compromised, the Navy may propose exempting those units from preservation, requesting concurrence from SHPO's with jurisdiction over the units, and may, upon agreement, proceed to the management of those units without further consultation or preservation measures. In absence of such an agreement, any such Priority III housing units will be managed in accordance with the terms of this PA.

        3. Capehart and Wherry Housing. There exist a significant number of Capehart and Wherry housing units under Navy control. For those units which the Navy may determine eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, if any, the Navy may propose designation of representative units for preservation, requesting concurrence from each SHPO with jurisdiction over the units. Upon reaching agreement with the specific SHPOs regarding representative units the Navy may proceed to manage and or dispose of those units not so designated for preservation without further consultation or preservation measures. In absence of such an agreement, any listed or eligible Capehart or Wherry units will be managed in accordance with the terms of this PA.

        4. Provide professional training in application of the Secretary's Standards to personnel responsible for maintenance and repair of Category I units, and for personnel responsible for decision making about maintenance and repair.

      2. Adaptive Use

        1. The Navy will give priority to the continued and adaptive use of the units in Category I, Priority I in carrying out the installation's mission and in assisting tenant activities in carrying out their missions.

        2. The Navy will actively encourage continuing use and adaptive use of other historic family housing units in carrying out the installation's mission, and in assisting tenant activities in carrying out their missions.

      3. Notice and Consultation

        1. The Navy will comply with 36 CFR Part 800 for all actions not listed in Appendix D that may affect Category I (Priority I) units.

        2. The Navy will notify the SHPO and other known interested parties (if any), of all actions not included in Appendix D (Actions That Do Not Require Consultation) when such actions affect Category I (Priority II) units and no other historic property. Such notification shall include a written description of the proposed action and shall afford the SHPO thirty (30) days to review and respond before the installation makes a decision to proceed with the action.

          Should the affected SHPO object to the proposed action within thirty (30) days after receipt of notice, the Navy shall delay its decision on the proposed action until it has complied with 36 CFR Part 800 for the proposed action.

        3. The Navy shall notify the SHPO and other known interested parties, of all actions not included in Appendix D (Actions That Do Not Require Consultation) when such actions affect non-exempt Category I (Priority III) units and no other historic property. Such notification shall include a written description of the proposed action and shall afford the SHPO thirty (30) days to review and respond before the installation makes a decision to proceed with the action.

          Should the SHPO object to the proposed action within thirty (30) days after receipt of notice, the Navy shall delay its decision on the proposed action until it has complied with the procedures for dispute resolution found in Stipulation VII of this agreement.

    3. Treatment of Category II family housing units.

      1. Treatment of Category II Units: The Navy shall not consult with SHPO, Council, or other interested parties regarding undertakings that will affect family housing units that have been evaluated in accordance with Stipulation I (1), but failed to meet the criteria for Category I, provided there is no potential for effect on other historic properties. The Navy need not maintain these units in accordance with the Secretary's Standards or MO-913 nor document such units prior to their destruction or alteration. However, if Category II units are located in historic districts, consultation in accordance with Stipulation V may be necessary to determine potential effects on contributing units within the district.

  4. Variations from Treatment Categories.

    1. In cases where undertakings relating to management of historic family housing units are not covered by this agreement, for example ground disturbance not covered in Appendix D: ACTIONS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE CONSULTATION, each installation shall initiate consultation pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800.

    2. In cases where operational requirements may require housing units to be treated in a manner different from those conventions listed above, each installation shall delay its decision on the proposed undertaking until it has complied with 36 CFR Part 800. Results of these actions will be included in the reporting requirement from Stipulation VIII below.

    3. Appendix D (Actions That Do Not Require Consultation), provides a list of undertakings that do not require public notification or consultation with the Council, NCSHPO or individual SHPOs.

  5. Potential Effects on Other Historic Properties.
    The Navy shall ensure that all actions that could affect historic properties other than historic family housing units categorized in accordance with this agreement are subjected to review in a timely manner in accordance with 36 CFR Part 800 or in accordance with some other agreement executed pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800.

  6. Administrative Stipulations.

    1. The Navy shall make every attempt to ensure that all work, including maintenance, repair and training, carried out by Navy personnel and contractors pursuant to this agreement is performed by or under the direct supervision of a person or persons meeting, at a minimum, the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualifications Standards (48 FR 44716, September 29, 1983) for the appropriate resource type.

    2. In order to meet the training requirements specified in this PA, the Navy shall develop appropriate training courses and a schedule for the training. Within six (6) months of the last signature to this PA, the Navy will develop and begin to implement the training program following ACHP review and approval.

      1. The training program will include distribution of this agreement, a copy of the Secretary's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties with Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating, Restoring, and Reconstructing Historic Buildings, and MO-913 to all appropriate Navy staff. The Navy will provide a list of personnel who receive this information to the ACHP and NCSHPO annually, on a date to be agreed upon.

    3. Execution of this PA does not prohibit the Navy from developing other agreement documents to govern the management of historic family housing units on specific installations or in specific regions or states, provided that subsequent agreements meet the intent of this PA. This PA does not supercede existing agreement documents that installations have already executed. Signatories to existing agreements must review and amend the existing agreement document to incorporate the provisions of this PA in order for it to take precedence over existing agreement documents.

  7. Dispute Resolution.

    1. Should any party to this agreement object to any action carried out or proposed by the Navy with respect to the implementation of this agreement, the officer responsible for the action shall consult with the objecting party to resolve the objection. If after initiating such consultation, the responsible officer determines that the objection cannot be resolved the officer shall forward all documentation relevant to the objection up the chain of command for resolution. If the objection remains unresolved, the Navy shall forward all documentation relevant to the objection to the Council, including the Navy's proposed response to the objection. Within thirty (30) days after receipt of all pertinent documentation, the Council shall exercise one of the following options:

      1. Advise the Navy that the Council concurs in the Navy's proposed final decision, whereupon the Navy shall respond to the objection accordingly;
      2. Provide the Navy with recommendations, which the Navy shall take into account in reaching a final decision regarding its response to the objection; or
      3. Notify the Navy that the objection will be referred to the Council membership for formal comment and proceed to refer the objection and comment within (30) days. The resulting comment shall be taken into account by the Navy in accordance with § 110(l), NHPA & 36 CFR 800.7 (c)(4).

    2. Should the Council not exercise one of the above options within thirty (30) days after receipt of all pertinent documentation, the Navy may assume the Council's concurrence in its proposed response to the objection.

    3. The Navy shall take into account any Council recommendation or comment provided in accordance with this stipulation with reference only to the subject of the objection; the Navy's responsibility to carry out all actions under this PA that are not the subjects of the objection shall remain unchanged.

    4. At any time during the implementation of the measures stipulated in this PA, should an objection pertaining to this PA be raised by a member of the public, the installation or activity responsible for the action objected to shall notify parties to this PA and take the objection into account, consulting with the objector and, should the objector so request, with any of the parties to this PA to resolve the objection.

  8. Annual Report and Review.

    1. Each year this PA remains in force, the Navy organizational component responsible for housing operations nationwide (currently NAVFACENGCOM HSG) shall track and coordinate categorization efforts Navy-wide. This entity will also prepare and provide via the chain of command an annual report to the Council, NCSHPO, and other interested parties known to the Navy, addressing the following topics:

      1. A list of installations for which categorization is complete;

      2. A list of installations for which categorization is ongoing;

      3. A list of SHPOs and other parties with whom consultation has been initiated during the past year regarding categorization and treatment;

      4. Problems with implementation or issues encountered during the year;

      5. Changes the Navy believes should be made in implementation of this PA;

      6. A list of properties treated under this agreement during the reporting period;

      7. A list of all Navy personnel receiving professional training during the reporting period.

    2. Via notification in the Federal Register, the Navy shall ensure that its annual report is made available for public inspection, that potentially interested members of the public are made aware of its availability, and that interested members of the public are invited to provide comments to the Council, NCSHPO, individual SHPOs and to the Navy.

    3. The Council and NCSHPO shall review the annual report and annually provide comments to the Navy, which will include a recommendation whether this PA shall continue in force, be amended, or be terminated.

  9. Amendments
    Any party to this PA may propose to the Navy that the PA be amended, whereupon the Navy shall consult with the other parties to this PA to consider such an amendment. 36 CFR Part 800 shall govern the execution of any such amendment.

  10. Termination

    1. If for any reason, the Navy determines that it cannot implement the terms of this PA, or if the NCSHPO or Council determines that the PA is not being properly implemented, the Navy, NCSHPO, or Council may propose to the other parties to this PA that it be terminated.

    2. The party proposing to terminate this PA shall so notify all parties to this PA, explaining the reasons for the proposed termination and affording them at least thirty (30) days to consult and seek alternatives to termination. The parties shall then consult.

    3. Should such consultation fail and the PA be terminated, the Navy shall ensure that each action that would otherwise be covered by this PA is reviewed in accordance with 36 CFR Part 800. The Navy may also consult in accordance with 36 CFR Part 800 to develop a new PA.

  11. Funding
    Funds programming, budgeting decisions and resource commitments will be made within Navy funding authority and no part of this PA exempts the Navy from the Anti-Deficiency Act.

  12. Signatures
    Execution of this PA by the Navy, NCSHPO and the Council, and implementation of its terms, evidence that the Navy has afforded the Council an opportunity to comment on the Navy's on-going management of its historic housing units, and that the Navy has taken into account the effects of its on-going management on the historic housing units and fully complies with NHPA Section 106 and 36 CFR Part 800.


UNITED STATES NAVY

By: Robert B. Pirie
   Assistant Secretary for Installations and Environment
Date: 11/13/00


ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION

By: Cathryn B. Slater
   Chairman
Date: 11/17/00


NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICERS

By: Judith Bittner
   President
Date: 11/17/00


Appendix A: Definition of "Historic Family Housing Units

  1. "Historic family housing units" may include any of the following, or any combination thereof:

    1. A building intended to provide family housing which is listed on or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

    2. A support building, such as a garden storage building or automobile garage, which is listed on or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

    3. A designed landscape associated with historic housing unit, that is, a parcel of land deliberately shaped or otherwise modified in accordance with a plan or design that is associated with historic housing units; examples include formal gardens, streetscapes and lawns.

    4. A fixed object in the landscape, that is, a relatively small-scale construction, usually primarily artistic in nature or having some purpose of visual reference; examples include statuary, sculpture, monuments, fountains or boundary markers associated with historic housing units.

    5. A district made up of buildings, structures, designed landscapes, and/or objects listed on or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, that is, a group or ensemble of such constructions making up a coherent whole; examples include a parade ground surrounded by housing units and designed landscape elements.


Appendix B: Navy Historic Family Housing CATEGORIZATION Protocol

Introduction and Background:

In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act and other applicable laws and regulations, the United States Navy (Navy) must consult with State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPO) to identify historic family housing units and evaluate their eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places. In addition, the Navy's Historic Family Housing Programmatic Agreement (PA) requires the Navy to consult with SHPOs to categorize each family housing unit into one of the two categories defined in Stipulation II of the PA. Furthermore, the relative historic significance of all housing units in Category I shall be assessed and assigned to a preservation treatment priority, defined below. The following guidelines, referred to as the Navy Historic Family Housing Categorization Protocol (Protocol), define the process the Navy must follow to categorize its family housing units.

To appropriately categorize family housing units, four basic questions must be answered:

  1. Is the property of central importance in defining an installation's historic character?

  2. Is the property important as a contributor to the historic character of the installation?

  3. Is the integrity of the property compromised in some way?

  4. How much potential does the property have for continued or adaptive use?

By effectively answering these questions, specific conclusions about the historic and architectural significance of individual family housing units within their context can be made, and ultimately each can be appropriately categorized. However, it is imperative to remember that categorization of family housing units requires consultation with the appropriate SHPO. As such, the appropriate SHPO must be notified in advance that on-site evaluations are taking place and invited to participate in the evaluation process.

This Protocol consists of three parts, each corresponding to the evaluation of family housing units on the basis of their:

  1. Individual Identity (Part A)

  2. Contextual Identity (Part B)

  3. Continuing or Adaptive Use Potential (Part C)

The three-part outline below presents a method for observing and evaluating the character-defining features of family housing units on site. As defined in the PA, the primary distinguishing factor among Category I, Priorities 1-3 and Category II is "integrity." Therefore, Parts A and B of this checklist focus heavily on the physical characteristics of family housing units and their surroundings, which give them identity.

According to National Register Bulletin (NRB) 15, "Integrity is the ability of a property to convey its significance," which is defined by the presence of its visible physical features. A family housing unit retaining historic integrity will possess a combination of the seven aspects of integrity. These include location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling and association. Of these aspects, location, design, setting, materials, and workmanship can be evaluated independently through a visual assessment of specific physical characteristics. By interpreting these aspects, Part A of the Protocol assesses a family housing unit's individual significance. The other two aspects of integrity, feeling and association, rely not only on the presence of the significant physical aspects described above, but also involve the establishment of broad and narrow relationships between family housing units and their context. The intent of Part B, then, is to evaluate the significance of family housing units in terms of their context. Finally, Part C is designed to document family housing units' forecasted continued/future use and potential feasibility for adaptive use. All three parts are required for appropriate categorization and subsequent prioritization.

All evaluations are to be conducted by qualified professionals with experience applying these concepts. These professionals include qualified historical architects or architectural historians meeting the Secretary of the Interior's Professional Qualification Standards [Department of the Interior, Archeology and Historic Preservation: Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines (48 FR 44716, September 29, 1983). It is important that all inspectors be able to interpret the information collected on the field checklists in a manner that will produce consistent conclusions for assigning the classification rating across all quarters visited.

Part A – Individual Identity:

In order to establish a rating for family housing units on the basis of individual identity, units should be evaluated against the seven evaluation criteria listed below. After evaluation, the next step is to assign a rating key number from 1 to 4 that best describes the housing unit's individual identity for each of the criteria. The highest rating in Part A or B will constitute the initial classification. The results determined in the supplementary information on continuing or adaptive use potential will be considered, when appropriate, as an additional factor in establishing the final classification.

Part A Evaluation Criteria:

  1. Site
  2. Shape
  3. Materials (exterior)
  4. Feature Design (exterior)
  5. Materials (interior)
  6. Feature Design (interior)
  7. Spatial Configuration

Part A Rating Key:

  1. Exhibits outstanding architectural, engineering, artistic or landscape characteristics, and retains integrity. (Eligible for the National Register.)
  2. Good example of architectural, engineering, artistic or landscape characteristics, but integrity is observably compromised. (Eligible for the National Register.)
  3. Visual integrity of characteristics is compromised; while visible character is generally intact. (Eligible for the National Register.)
  4. No noteworthy characteristics, or complete loss of integrity. (Not eligible for the National Register.)


Category I – Priority I (Part A):

A housing unit exhibiting outstanding architectural, engineering, artistic or landscape characteristics might retain a massing and building form characteristic of its style and original design that is not overshadowed by later additions and/or alterations to its overall shape or solid/void relationship. It might also retain visible original building materials or compatible replacements that are consistent with the original character and design, a substantial number of building features characteristic of the time period for which the building is significant and an interior spatial configuration which remains cohesive.

Category I – Priority II (Part A):

A housing unit considered a good example of architectural, engineering, artistic or landscape characteristics, but lacking some observable integrity, might consist of similar characteristics as described above for rating 1. However, this housing unit might lack the high concentration of visible original detailing and/or consist of some modifications to the massing or spatial relationships.

Category I – Priority III (Part A):

A housing unit in which the visual integrity of characteristics is compromised will likely have the form of the building altered by the introduction of minor additions, porches or landscape features and/or the alteration of projections or recesses. Additionally, building features and materials may have been replaced and original interior spatial arrangement may have been altered. Though these types of alterations can detract from or overshadow the original massing, the overall integrity of the housing unit remains intact.

Category II (Part A):

Category II housing units are buildings which have no architectural or historical significance whatsoever.


Part B – Contextual Identity:

In order to establish a rating for family housing units on the basis of their contextual identity (i.e. the way they relate to their environment), units should be evaluated against the three evaluation criteria listed below. After evaluation, the objective is to again assign a rating key number from 1 to 4 that best describes the housing unit's contextual identity for each of the criteria. Again, the highest rating in Part A or B will constitute the initial classification. The results determined in the supplementary information on continuing or adaptive use potential will be considered, when appropriate, as an additional factor in establishing the final classification.

Part B Evaluation Criteria:

  1. Context of housing unit within the installation.
  2. Immediate context of the housing unit (contribution to the neighborhood).
  3. Associative significance (with naval history, significant events, etc.).

Part B Rating Key

  1. Central to defining or maintaining the character of its context; high concentration of features for which the neighborhood is recognized.
  2. Contributes substantially to the character of its context; visibly supports architectural or stylistic themes.
  3. Compatible with the character of its context.
  4. Does not contribute to the eligible or listed property.

Category I – Priority I (Part B):

A housing unit determined central to defining or maintaining the character of its context should retain a high concentration of features for which the neighborhood is recognized. It might also possess high integrity with reference to original design/construction features (including spatial arrangement, architectural massing, ornamentation and detailing, major systems [roofing/walls windows] and/or landscaping). Typically, such a property will be rated a "1" in Part A, and represent one contributing unit in an ensemble of like or related buildings which, as a group, manifest a recognizable or discernible appearance to residents, visitors or the public at large. Also to classify as a Level One in this category, the neighborhood or ensemble shall be comprised of a substantial majority (above 75%) of such buildings with high integrity, such that they are the predominate type rather than the exception.

Category I – Priority II (Part B):

A housing unit which contributes substantially to the character of its context and visibly supports the architectural or stylistic character of the neighborhood or installation might consist of similar characteristics as described above for rating 1, but either lacks some original design elements or has limited non-compatible elements or materials. Such a building will likely be either rated a "2" in Part A, or the neighborhood in which the building exists has fewer buildings of high integrity or a greater mix of high, medium and low integrity buildings, resulting in a visible degradation of visual, stylistic and architectural cohesion. The visual perceptions and feelings of harmony and compatibility in the neighborhood are reduced as a result of these factors.

Category I – Priority III (Part B):

A housing unit which is compatible with the character of its context, but is neither a "1" nor a "2" above, might lack the strongest integrity (i.e. rated a "2" or "3" in Part A). The effect of this is a lesser visual impact on residents, visitors and the public. While the residential appearance of the neighborhood may remain intact, the visual connection to recognizable architectural styles or historical periods is less than that of "1" or "2" housing units.

Category II (Part B):

A housing unit which does not contribute to an eligible or listed district might be rated a "3" or "4" in Part A and exist in a neighborhood with few buildings containing design and stylistic integrity and/or in a neighborhood with over 50% voids or incompatible building types. The visual appearance of the neighborhood is confusing and lacks cohesion, and may in fact appear disjointed or unplanned and haphazard in its overall siting.


Part C – Continued or Adaptive Use Potential:

To complete Part C of the Protocol, information must be collected on the potential for continued or adaptive use of a particular building. Such information should be derived from:

  1. Documented potential (documented plans for future adaptive use)
  2. Observable potential (based on spatial configuration, etc.)
  3. Reported observations from site personnel
  4. Continued use (i.e. has the building been continually used for extended periods?)

The completion of the continued or adaptive use potential information section is intended to provide additional information about each family housing unit. Specifically, inspectors should note whether or not a housing unit appears to be secure in its continued use as housing, has already been considered for alternative uses, and/or has the potential for alternative uses. Input may be developed through written reports, conversations with site personnel, direct observation, oral reports from site personnel and the physical relationship to other infrastructure within the installation.


Appendix C: Public Involvement

The Navy encouraged public comment and involvement on the development of this PA in the following venues:

  1. Professional Housing Management Association (PHMA) Meeting - housing management peers, Tulsa OK, 24-27 February 1998;

  2. State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPO) Meeting - Washington DC, 7-11 March 1998;

  3. Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) Annual Meeting - professional architectural historians – Los Angeles CA, 15-19 April 1998;

  4. American Institute of Architects (AIA) Annual Meeting - design professionals - San Francisco CA, 15-19 April 1998;

  5. National Trust for Historic Preservation Annual Meeting - general public – Savannah GA, 20-25 October 1998;

  6. Results of a preliminary categorization effort and supporting documentation mailed to affected SHPOs for comment – 13 August, 1998;

  7. Revised draft PA, explanatory letter and CD ROM containing lists and images of preliminarily categorized housing units mailed to affected SHPOs – 1 March 1999; and

  8. Local Public Forums - general public in the vicinity of the housing units at individual installations. Notification via local newspapers.


    Appendix D: Actions That Do Not Require Consultation

    The following undertakings do not require consultation with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (Council) or any State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) provided that:

    1. They are carried out in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties with Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating, Restoring, and Reconstructing Historic Buildings and, where applicable, the National Park Service Preservation Briefs; and

    2. That the Navy maintain documentation identifying any original material that must be replaced in-kind and documentation on why such in-kind replacement was necessary.

    Interior Work

    1. Plumbing system rehabilitation/replacement, to include pipes and fixtures in both bathrooms and kitchens;

    2. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning rehabilitation/replacement including furnaces, pipes, radiators or other heating/air conditioning units;

    3. Rehabilitation/replacement of electrical wiring including lighting, fire alarms, smoke/heat detectors, fire suppression systems, telephones, and local area network;

    4. Bathroom improvements, including alterations necessary for handicap access;

    5. Interior surface (floors, walls, ceiling, woodwork) treatments, providing the work is restricted to repainting, refinishing, re-papering, re-paneling, or laying carpet, linoleum, or other recognized floor systems;

    6. Insulation; and

    7. Replacement/repair of vertical transportation systems (i.e. elevators and stairs).

    Exterior Work

    1. Repair or replacement of siding, trim, or hardware when done in kind to match existing or original material and design.

    2. Replacement of glass when done in kind to match existing material and design. Window glass may be double or triple glazed as long as it is clear and replacement does not alter existing window glazing rabbets. This excludes the use of tinted glass, which will require consultation.

    3. Maintenance of features such as window and door frames, hoodmolds, paneled or decorated jambs and moldings through appropriate surface treatments, such as cleaning, rust removal, limited paint removal, and reapplication of protective coating systems.

    4. Repair or replacement of roofs or parts of a roof that are deteriorated, when done in- kind to match existing or original material and design.

    5. Repair or replacement of porches and stairs when done in kind to match existing material and design.

    6. Repair of window frames by patching, splicing, consolidating or otherwise reinforcing or replacing in kind those parts that are extensively deteriorated or are missing. The same configuration of panes will be retained.

    7. Installation of storm windows, provided that they conform to the shape and size of historic windows and that the meeting rail coincides with that of the existing sash. Color shall match prime window color; mill finish aluminum is not acceptable.

    8. Painting exterior surfaces when the new paint matches the existing or original color. If the existing paint color is not desirable and the original color is not known, the color should be in keeping with historic color schemes. Damaged or deteriorated paint may be removed to the next sound layer, using the gentlest methods possible, such as hand scraping or hand sanding. Abrasive methods, such as sandblasting and water blasting, are not allowed.

    9. Replacement or installation of caulking and weather stripping around windows, doors, walls, and roofs.

    10. Repair and replacement of gutters and down spouts in kind.

    11. In-kind sidewalk, driveway and curbing repair or replacements.

    Other Work

    1. In-kind street, parking lots, driveway, sidewalk, curb and gutter and storm drainage structure repair or replacements;

    2. Routine repairs and maintenance of piers, berths, and dry docks, including repair/replacement of dolphins, piling, decking, cleats, bollards, or capstans, that are assigned to historic family housing units to maintain operational capability;

    3. Use of interpretive signs or exhibit structures which are not attached to a historic property and that do not visually intrude on a historic property. They shall be constructed of materials and painted colors that harmonize with the historic property and its setting;

    4. Installation of utilities, such as sewer, water, storm, electrical, gas, steam, compressed air, leach lines, and septic tanks, where installation is restricted to areas previously disturbed by installation of these utilities;

    5. Repair/replacement/installation of exterior lighting;

    6. Repair/maintenance of swimming pools; outdoor playground and athletic equipment; and related items.

    Emergency Work
    In those situations where unanticipated and sudden events, such as fire or storm damage, irreversibly alter the structural stability of a property, rendering it an immediate health and safety hazard, Navy will:

    1. Take the necessary steps to make the property safe and secure.

    2. Advise SHPO of the situation, providing a brief description of the nature of the emergency and corrective work.


Updated April 30, 2002

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