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Home arrow Working with Section 106 arrow ACHP Case Digest arrow Spring 2003 arrow Virginia: Implementation of the Jamestown Project
Virginia: Implementation of the Jamestown Project

Agency: National Park Service

In a spirit of “unprecedented collaboration” between public and private entities, the National Park Service is joining with the State of Virginia and the owner of the Jamestown National Historic Site to develop activities that commemorate the 400th anniversary of America’s first English settlement in 2007.

Among other proposals, the plan calls for interpretive components that reflect input from the NAACP and Indian tribes; the development of a transportation system among Jamestown Settlement, Historic Jamestowne, and Colonial Williamsburg; park improvements such as new curatorial facility for collections; and the issuance of commemorative stamps and coins.

An agreement was recently executed among the project’s consulting parties to ensure that the project’s effects on the historic properties are considered.

Jamestown, Virginia, is often called “the birthplace of American democracy.” It was here that English pioneers settled on the banks of the James River in 1607 and later held the first representative assembly in the New World.

Today, the Federal Government is collaborating with the private owner of the Jamestown National Historic Site and the Commonwealth of Virginia to develop activities to celebrate the settlement’s 400th anniversary in 2007.

Glassblowers at Historic Jamestowne, Virginia

 

 

Glassblowers at Historic Jamestowne, VA, one of the destinations of the proposed Jamestown Project transportation system (photo courtesy of National Park Service)

 

The commemoration, known as the Jamestown Project, will include interpretive components that reflect input from Indian tribes and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; park improvements such as a new curatorial facility for collections; the development of a transportation system among Jamestown Settlement, Historic Jamestowne, and Colonial Williamsburg; and the issuance of stamps and coins to honor America’s first settlement.

In 2002, the National Park Service released a Development Concept Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for the Jamestown Project for public comment, and the ACHP joined in Section 106 consultation on the project.

In what the Virginia Governor called “unprecedented collaboration,” the Federal agency, NPS, the lead State agency, Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, and the private owner of the Jamestown National Historic Site, Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, agreed to jointly plan and carry out the commemoration events for the historic site.

The ACHP, the Virginia State Historic Preservation Officer, the Virginia Council on Indians, and the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities developed an agreement, which was executed in March 2003.

The agreement provides for NPS to continue to consult with the ACHP, the Virginia SHPO, APVA, the NAACP, James City County, the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, the Virginia Council on Indians, and the public as the Jamestown Project’s effects to historic properties are addressed.

Individual Indian tribes, including the Chickahominy Tribe, the Eastern Chickahominy Tribe, the Mattaponi Tribe, The Monocan Nation, the Nansemond Tribe, the Pamunkey Tribe, the Rappahannock Tribe, the United Indians of Virginia, and the Upper Mattaponi Tribe, have been offered a role in the Agreement’s implementation if they have an interest.

Staff contact: Martha Catlin

Updated August 15, 2003

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